Parents pushing kids in sports

Parents might disagree about money, home chores, or how to spend time. They might disagree about big things — like important decisions they need to make for the family. Sometimes parents can disagree with each other and still manage to talk about it in a calm way, where both people get a chance to listen and to talk.

Parents pushing kids in sports

Recently, one of her players, a 7-year-old boy, hit the boards during an indoor game and was holding his head. His father, a former soccer player himself, went over to the boy but rather than asking him how he was feeling, scolded him for playing poorly.

A week later, his mother called him over after a play and she, too, sharply criticized him. If kids truly hate a sport, then let them quit. But maybe they just need some encouragement.

But then there's the rub – college educations are undeniably valuable.

Some or year-olds may wish their parents had pushed them more to stick with sports when they were younger rather than giving up, he adds. Injury toll Aside from the psychological pressures that young athletes may experience from intense training and competition, physical complaints are a growing concern, sports medicine specialists say.

One of the most comprehensive surveys to date, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that from to sports and recreation-related injuries were more common nationwide than injuries from traffic accidents.

Americans ages 5 to 24 were most likely to be treated for sports-related injuries by health professionals. Kids 5 to 14 had the highest injury rates of all -— A fifth of kids lost one or more school days a year because of their complaints.

Strains and sprains accounted for the most injuries overall, followed by fractures. Among kids 5 to 14, bicycling was associated with the most injuries, followed by basketball, football, playground equipment and baseball or softball.

In those 15 to 24, basketball and football were linked to the most injuries. Greater sports participation, particularly among girls in recent decades, is one reason injuries appear to be rising, experts say.

A study published last September in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that over the last 30 years in the area around Rochester, Minn. Also on the rise are knee injuries known as anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, tears that are more likely to affect girls, often those who play basketball or soccer.Most parents want their kids to stay out of trouble, do well in school, and go on to live successful lives as adults.

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Parents pushing kids in sports

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